Grimsdell pupils raised £14,000 for Great Ormond Street Hospital and Leukaemia Research

Naomi Angel and Sophie Loveday with Grimsdell School pupils and leukaemia sufferer Evie Nash, front

Naomi Angel and Sophie Loveday with Grimsdell School pupils and leukaemia sufferer Evie Nash, front

First published in News
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Times Series: Photograph of the Author by , Reporter

There were cheers and laughter as children at a Mill Hill primary school presented two charities with £14,000 they had raised to combat leukaemia.

Pupils at Grimsdell Pre-Preparatory School in Mill Hill raised £14,727 for Great Ormond Street Hospital and charity Leukaemia and Lymphoma Research by completing a series of laps of the grounds of Mill Hill School.

The walk was orgnaised after a pupil in the school’s nursery, four-year-old Evie Nash, was diagnosed with leukaemia on New Year’s Eve.

Her mother, Kelly Nash, 44, said how grateful for the money the school had raised to help children like Evie.

She said: “It is fantastic that a school this size could raise so much money. The children and teachers have been so supportive; it makes me feel I made a good choice sending Evie to this school.”

Evie has been treated at Watford General Hospital and at Great Ormond Street Hospital. Mrs Nash added her daughter had finished chemotherapy and was back with her family in Radlett.

Mrs Nash said: “She should be in remission, things are getting on well.

“Hopefully she will be returning to reception at Grimsdell School this September.”

In a special assembly this morning, schools presenter for Great Ormond Street Hospital Naomi Angel thanked the children and reminded them to thank their parents for their efforts in raising so much money for the children’s hospital.

She said: “Great Ormond Street hospital is very grateful to receive this money, which will be used to improve the care we can give to children like Evie.”

Regional fundraising assistant for Leukaemia and Lymphoma Research Sophie Loveday also expressed her gratitude at the children’s efforts.

She said: “This is an amazing amount of money that will go towards funding research centres and diagnosis and treatment across the country. When we started in 1960, childhood leukaemia was a death sentence. Now 92 per cent of children who are diagnosed survive.

“We have a long way to go, but with this money we can help beat blood cancer.”

Around 150 children and staff took part in the walks at the beginning of March.

Nursery and Reception children completed one lap of the grounds and Years 1 and 2 did two laps, while carrying Great Ormond Street balloons. Each lap was about half a mile.

Headteacher of Grimsdell School Pauline Bennett-Mills said she was delighted the walk had been such a success.

“I am so pleased at the response we received from children and parents. The children understood their little friend was ill and they were raising money to give her the right medicines to help make her better.”

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