Teachers protest over plans to cut staff at Barnet and Southgate College

Times Series: Staff strike outside Barnet and Southgate College in Wood Street Staff strike outside Barnet and Southgate College in Wood Street

Teachers, students and support staff gathered outside a college to protest against plans to sack staff.

The group stood outside Barnet and Southgate College Wood Street campus as they chanted and held signs declaring Save Further Education, No Confidence in the Principal, and Save Lecturer Jobs.

The row centres on the college's plans to sack approximately 30 staff.

The decision came after a 45-day consultation process in which Principal David Byrne and senior management assessed the needs of the college.

Members of the University and College Union (UCU) at the college unanimously passed a motion of no confidence in Mr Byrne and the college's senior management.

The UCU is asking the college to defer any further redundancies until autumn, when student recruitment numbers for the next academic year are known.

The next step is a selection process in which the college will notify the faculty about who will lose their jobs.

Similar protests took place at Southgate and Grahame Park campuses earlier today.

A spokesman for the college said: "Barnet and Southgate College, like all other FE Colleges, is facing funding cuts and due to these reductions, it has needed to make changes. 

"The college has undertaken an extensive consultation exercise, taken on board comments from staff potentially affected and the recognised trade unions which has reduced the effects of redundancies through voluntary redundancies and other amendments to the original proposal following consideration of the feedback received.

"The college's aim remains to serve our local community effectively whilst remaining a thriving and progressive organisation by ensuring our provision is relevant to our local workforce and finding more efficient and innovative ways of working."

Comments (13)

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4:39pm Tue 24 Jun 14

AverageBarnetResident says...

Same old teachers, always striking.
Same old teachers, always striking. AverageBarnetResident
  • Score: -6

4:07pm Thu 26 Jun 14

Mr. Datchery says...

AverageBarnetResiden
t
wrote:
Same old teachers, always striking.
No they aren't and you know it.
[quote][p][bold]AverageBarnetResiden t[/bold] wrote: Same old teachers, always striking.[/p][/quote]No they aren't and you know it. Mr. Datchery
  • Score: 2

5:48pm Thu 26 Jun 14

AverageBarnetResident says...

Yes they are, and you know it. Clearly the job security, great hours, superior pensions, good pay, and excessive holidays are just not enough for some people.
I wish I was a teacher.
Yes they are, and you know it. Clearly the job security, great hours, superior pensions, good pay, and excessive holidays are just not enough for some people. I wish I was a teacher. AverageBarnetResident
  • Score: -3

6:59pm Thu 26 Jun 14

Misuc2 says...

Mr. Datchery wrote:
AverageBarnetResiden

t
wrote:
Same old teachers, always striking.
No they aren't and you know it.
If you object to them taking time off work, why don't you object to them being removed from their jobs?
[quote][p][bold]Mr. Datchery[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]AverageBarnetResiden t[/bold] wrote: Same old teachers, always striking.[/p][/quote]No they aren't and you know it.[/p][/quote]If you object to them taking time off work, why don't you object to them being removed from their jobs? Misuc2
  • Score: 0

7:21am Fri 27 Jun 14

Mr. Datchery says...

AverageBarnetResiden
t
wrote:
Yes they are, and you know it. Clearly the job security, great hours, superior pensions, good pay, and excessive holidays are just not enough for some people.
I wish I was a teacher.
Brilliant response Misuc2

As for 'AverageBarnetReside
nt" (You assume too much by the way)
"Great hours"
"Primary state school teachers in England are working almost 60 hours a
week, according to a survey by the Department for Education ... said teachers were now fitting in the equivalent of an extra full day a week by working during evenings and weekends....he worst-off in terms of workload were headteachers in secondary schools, who recorded an average of 63 hours and 20 minutes a week."
"Teachers in England work longer hours than their counterparts in almost every other country in the world, a major international survey has revealed."
This is from that noted left wing paper The Daily Mail
"a survey for TES Connectl found that they ‘work most of the time’ on holiday."
"job security"
This article is about staff cuts.
"good pay"
I just did an ( admittedly rough ) calculation and I reckon newly qualified teachers in London are getting £6.82 net per hour based on the above figures.
"superior pensions"
I worked in the public sector for over 41 years (not as a teacher, I found it easier to work in a prison) throughout that time I paid taxes and had 6-7% of my salary deducted in pension payments. My pension isn't bad but if my wife wasn't still working I'd be in trouble.
On top of this teachers are berated by the Government and the likes of you and assaulted, and as recently shown, killed by their pupils and the pupils' parents.
As somebody once said "You are entitled to your own opinions but not your own facts."
[quote][p][bold]AverageBarnetResiden t[/bold] wrote: Yes they are, and you know it. Clearly the job security, great hours, superior pensions, good pay, and excessive holidays are just not enough for some people. I wish I was a teacher.[/p][/quote]Brilliant response Misuc2 As for 'AverageBarnetReside nt" (You assume too much by the way) "Great hours" "Primary state school teachers in England are working almost 60 hours a week, according to a survey by the Department for Education ... said teachers were now fitting in the equivalent of an extra full day a week by working during evenings and weekends....he worst-off in terms of workload were headteachers in secondary schools, who recorded an average of 63 hours and 20 minutes a week." "Teachers in England work longer hours than their counterparts in almost every other country in the world, a major international survey has revealed." This is from that noted left wing paper The Daily Mail "a survey for TES Connectl found that they[teachers] ‘work most of the time’ on holiday." "job security" This article is about staff cuts. "good pay" I just did an ( admittedly rough ) calculation and I reckon newly qualified teachers in London are getting £6.82 net per hour based on the above figures. "superior pensions" I worked in the public sector for over 41 years (not as a teacher, I found it easier to work in a prison) throughout that time I paid taxes and had 6-7% of my salary deducted in pension payments. My pension isn't bad but if my wife wasn't still working I'd be in trouble. On top of this teachers are berated by the Government and the likes of you and assaulted, and as recently shown, killed by their pupils and the pupils' parents. As somebody once said "You are entitled to your own opinions but not your own facts." Mr. Datchery
  • Score: 3

4:53pm Fri 27 Jun 14

AverageBarnetResident says...

Firstly, I would hardly consider DoE “surveys” factual. If you ask teachers how many hours they work they are bound to exaggerate, anyone would.

I know a number of teachers, none of whom work anything like a 60 hour week. I work in an industry where people really do work long hours, and the senior people (equivalent of headteachers) certainly do a lot more than 60 hours. I don’t dispute that some teachers work very hard, but so do lots of people from a range of industries, and we don’t all get 15 weeks holiday! That is why other hard-working people find it hard to swallow when teachers go on strike all the time.

Personally I’d be happy to mark some homework in front of the TV each night in return for the whole summer/Christmas/Eas
ter/half-terms/strik
e days off.

Despite your loose calculations/compari
sons, teachers do enjoy better pay and pensions than many.

Also, another one of your “surveys” found that teachers work “most of the time” whilst on holiday. Well, if you believe that, you’ll believe anything my friend.
Firstly, I would hardly consider DoE “surveys” factual. If you ask teachers how many hours they work they are bound to exaggerate, anyone would. I know a number of teachers, none of whom work anything like a 60 hour week. I work in an industry where people really do work long hours, and the senior people (equivalent of headteachers) certainly do a lot more than 60 hours. I don’t dispute that some teachers work very hard, but so do lots of people from a range of industries, and we don’t all get 15 weeks holiday! That is why other hard-working people find it hard to swallow when teachers go on strike all the time. Personally I’d be happy to mark some homework in front of the TV each night in return for the whole summer/Christmas/Eas ter/half-terms/strik e days off. Despite your loose calculations/compari sons, teachers do enjoy better pay and pensions than many. Also, another one of your “surveys” found that teachers work “most of the time” whilst on holiday. Well, if you believe that, you’ll believe anything my friend. AverageBarnetResident
  • Score: -5

5:38pm Fri 27 Jun 14

Barnet Parker says...

I wish I worked in an industry like AverageBarnetResiden
t where the bosses think you're working long hours but actually you're surfing the internet leaving comments on the local newspaper website.
I wish I worked in an industry like AverageBarnetResiden t where the bosses think you're working long hours but actually you're surfing the internet leaving comments on the local newspaper website. Barnet Parker
  • Score: 3

8:51am Sat 28 Jun 14

Mr. Datchery says...

AverageBarnetResiden
t
wrote:
Firstly, I would hardly consider DoE “surveys” factual. If you ask teachers how many hours they work they are bound to exaggerate, anyone would.

I know a number of teachers, none of whom work anything like a 60 hour week. I work in an industry where people really do work long hours, and the senior people (equivalent of headteachers) certainly do a lot more than 60 hours. I don’t dispute that some teachers work very hard, but so do lots of people from a range of industries, and we don’t all get 15 weeks holiday! That is why other hard-working people find it hard to swallow when teachers go on strike all the time.

Personally I’d be happy to mark some homework in front of the TV each night in return for the whole summer/Christmas/Eas

ter/half-terms/strik

e days off.

Despite your loose calculations/compari

sons, teachers do enjoy better pay and pensions than many.

Also, another one of your “surveys” found that teachers work “most of the time” whilst on holiday. Well, if you believe that, you’ll believe anything my friend.
Don't like being proved wrong do you. So you know 'a number of teachers' -(how many?) and this means you know better than the Department of Education and the Times Educational Supplement whose parent company's website designed to help teachers prepare lessons is busiest at the week ends (they aren't 'my' surveys). However when you're blinkered World view is proved to be baseless you resort to alleging that teachers basically lie about their working hours, a sure sign of desperation.
[quote][p][bold]AverageBarnetResiden t[/bold] wrote: Firstly, I would hardly consider DoE “surveys” factual. If you ask teachers how many hours they work they are bound to exaggerate, anyone would. I know a number of teachers, none of whom work anything like a 60 hour week. I work in an industry where people really do work long hours, and the senior people (equivalent of headteachers) certainly do a lot more than 60 hours. I don’t dispute that some teachers work very hard, but so do lots of people from a range of industries, and we don’t all get 15 weeks holiday! That is why other hard-working people find it hard to swallow when teachers go on strike all the time. Personally I’d be happy to mark some homework in front of the TV each night in return for the whole summer/Christmas/Eas ter/half-terms/strik e days off. Despite your loose calculations/compari sons, teachers do enjoy better pay and pensions than many. Also, another one of your “surveys” found that teachers work “most of the time” whilst on holiday. Well, if you believe that, you’ll believe anything my friend.[/p][/quote]Don't like being proved wrong do you. So you know 'a number of teachers' -(how many?) and this means you know better than the Department of Education and the Times Educational Supplement whose parent company's website designed to help teachers prepare lessons is busiest at the week ends (they aren't 'my' surveys). However when you're blinkered World view is proved to be baseless you resort to alleging that teachers basically lie about their working hours, a sure sign of desperation. Mr. Datchery
  • Score: 3

1:03pm Sun 29 Jun 14

harvey_uk says...

Doesn't getting around 13 weeks off a year balance out working longer hours during term time?
Doesn't getting around 13 weeks off a year balance out working longer hours during term time? harvey_uk
  • Score: -1

3:29pm Sun 29 Jun 14

Mr. Datchery says...

harvey_uk wrote:
Doesn't getting around 13 weeks off a year balance out working longer hours during term time?
"The chief exec of TSL Education, the parent company of TES Connect, said today: ‘It comes as no surprise to us that teachers are amongst the hardest working profession.
‘Every week teachers spend thousands of hours preparing their lessons for the classroom - our site is busiest on Sunday afternoons...they ‘work most of the time’ on holiday.
However I don't expect that 'AverageBarnetReside
nt' (which he **** well isn't) ,or maybe you, will change your opinion because as one of the wisest ever Englishmen (in my view) the Reverend Sydney Smith (1771 - 1845) said
"Never try to reason the prejudice out of a man. It was not reasoned into him, and cannot be reasoned out."
[quote][p][bold]harvey_uk[/bold] wrote: Doesn't getting around 13 weeks off a year balance out working longer hours during term time?[/p][/quote]"The chief exec of TSL Education, the parent company of TES Connect, said today: ‘It comes as no surprise to us that teachers are amongst the hardest working profession. ‘Every week teachers spend thousands of hours preparing their lessons for the classroom - our site is busiest on Sunday afternoons...they ‘work most of the time’ on holiday. However I don't expect that 'AverageBarnetReside nt' (which he **** well isn't) ,or maybe you, will change your opinion because as one of the wisest ever Englishmen (in my view) the Reverend Sydney Smith (1771 - 1845) said "Never try to reason the prejudice out of a man. It was not reasoned into him, and cannot be reasoned out." Mr. Datchery
  • Score: 1

11:39am Mon 30 Jun 14

AverageBarnetResident says...

Barnet Parker – touché! Your comment actually made me laugh out loud. Well played old chap.
Barnet Parker – touché! Your comment actually made me laugh out loud. Well played old chap. AverageBarnetResident
  • Score: 0

11:54am Mon 30 Jun 14

AverageBarnetResident says...

As I said before, I have no doubt that teachers work hard. They probably even look at websites at the weekend. Good for them. However, the rest of us also work hard (often at evenings/weekends) and don’t get all the time off and government-funded pensions. Overall, teaching is amongst the most desirable of professions, as the numerous teachers’ unions would admit. That’s why it’s so difficult for the public to swallow the constant striking!
As I said before, I have no doubt that teachers work hard. They probably even look at websites at the weekend. Good for them. However, the rest of us also work hard (often at evenings/weekends) and don’t get all the time off and government-funded pensions. Overall, teaching is amongst the most desirable of professions, as the numerous teachers’ unions would admit. That’s why it’s so difficult for the public to swallow the constant striking! AverageBarnetResident
  • Score: -2

3:08pm Mon 30 Jun 14

Mr. Datchery says...

" all the time off and government-funded pensions. teaching is amongst the most desirable of professions, as the numerous teachers’ unions would admit. That’s why it’s so difficult for the public to swallow the constant striking!"
I have demonstrated how teachers have to work during their holidays, public sector workers pay taxes the same as everybody else and as I said have money deducted from their salaries to pay for their pensions. If it is such a desirable profession explain these extracts,
"Teacher shortage reaching crisis levels
Almost three out of four local education authorities in England is experiencing a teacher shortage, a survey showed today, and 18 per cent of those polled said the problem had reached crisis levels....Asked what the Government should do to remedy the situation, several councils said society needed to value teachers more highly...A spokesman for the Department for Education and Employment said the Government had taken 'decisive steps' to make teaching more attractive."
The last statement doesn't match up with the actions of the egregious Gove and Wilshaw the ultimate school bully .
But if you want all these so-called benefits become a teacher!

Justify your use of the term 'constant striking'
" all the time off and government-funded pensions. teaching is amongst the most desirable of professions, as the numerous teachers’ unions would admit. That’s why it’s so difficult for the public to swallow the constant striking!" I have demonstrated how teachers have to work during their holidays, public sector workers pay taxes the same as everybody else and as I said have money deducted from their salaries to pay for their pensions. If it is such a desirable profession explain these extracts, "Teacher shortage reaching crisis levels Almost three out of four local education authorities in England is experiencing a teacher shortage, a survey showed today, and 18 per cent of those polled said the problem had reached crisis levels....Asked what the Government should do to remedy the situation, several councils said society needed to value teachers more highly...A spokesman for the Department for Education and Employment said the Government had taken 'decisive steps' to make teaching more attractive." The last statement doesn't match up with the actions of the egregious Gove and Wilshaw the ultimate school bully . But if you want all these so-called benefits become a teacher! Justify your use of the term 'constant striking' Mr. Datchery
  • Score: 7

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