Developers reject claims £4.5 billion Brent Cross Cricklewood project is ‘dead in the water’

Times Series: The £4.5billion project is still going to go ahead say developers The £4.5billion project is still going to go ahead say developers

Developers claim they are “committed” to the controversial Brent Cross Cricklewood redevelopment - despite campaigners’ concerns that part of the scheme will be scrapped.

The £4.5 billion plans include doubling the size of Brent Cross Shopping Centre and a large-scale regeneration of Cricklewood, including new office blocks and houses.

Development partners Hammerson and Standard Life say they will carry out all of the work alongside Barnet Borough Council, although a new partner will be drafted in to help out.

But protest group Brent Cross Coalition says an additional partner was not part of the plan, claiming the current developers are only concerned with developing the shopping centre.

David Howard, a member of the group, told the Times Series: “This was never the plan and if it was then we’ve been deceived.

“Now it looks like the plans are going to be broken up between lots of different developers. This is a piecemeal approach which is very worrying. There will be no cohesion and inevitably it will lead to mix-up and mess.

“We’re not against regeneration – the area is ripe for regeneration. But these proposals will have a negative impact across the whole borough, not just Brent Cross and Cricklewood.

“It’s going to cause adverse effects for existing shops, cause gridlock on the roads and make life a misery for residents living in the area. There will be no benefit other than to the developers – the community is not going to gain anything form this.

“We’ve said all along this is about doubling the size of the shopping centre, and all the rest is window dressing.”

Brent Cross Coalition member, Brent Councillor Alison Hopkins, added: “Now they’re looking for a new partner I think the scheme is in trouble - it's dead in the water. 

"The plans have only ever been about doubling the size of the shopping centre, full stop.”

But developers say they are determined to complete all the proposed plans. 

Mike McGuinness, development director for Brent Cross Cricklewood Development Partners, said: "We remain committed to the delivery of this vital regeneration project and we are actively working with Barnet Council to secure improvements to the current plans, which we will bring forward for public consultation this summer. 

“We have always been clear that we would bring on board other partners to help build out such a large scale project and this remains the case and any such appointment will be a joint process with Barnet Council."

Council leader Councillor Richard Cornelius added: “The scheme is all about improving the shopping centre and regenerating the other side of the north circular. We need practical ways of doing this and the whole area must be better.”

Comments (2)

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3:30pm Fri 26 Apr 13

Jon10 says...

Mayor Boris called the scheme "Dead in the Water" in the Evening Standard.

Hammerson has risen to its normal level of PR guff on the subject, I see.

It is remarkable that such a successful property company seems to put its least talented staff on to the 'Brent Cross Cricklewood' project. And that applies to the last 10 years.

Hammerson is now trying to merely push through parts of its rejected car-based 1996 shopping centre plan, and to hell with the rest of the twitching corpse.

So it's an 'out-of-town cinema', now, is it? That will help local high streets.

So much for all of Hammerson's promises at the Barnet planning committee in 2009. Strangely, no-one was allowed to video that - or even allowed to take short-hand dictation notes!
Mayor Boris called the scheme "Dead in the Water" in the Evening Standard. Hammerson has risen to its normal level of PR guff on the subject, I see. It is remarkable that such a successful property company seems to put its least talented staff on to the 'Brent Cross Cricklewood' project. And that applies to the last 10 years. Hammerson is now trying to merely push through parts of its rejected car-based 1996 shopping centre plan, and to hell with the rest of the twitching corpse. So it's an 'out-of-town cinema', now, is it? That will help local high streets. So much for all of Hammerson's promises at the Barnet planning committee in 2009. Strangely, no-one was allowed to video that - or even allowed to take short-hand dictation notes! Jon10

4:46pm Sun 28 Apr 13

kilburn says...

Have I slept for the past eleven years? Are we still in 2002 or are we in 2013 yet back where we started but with huge amounts of public money wasted on going through the motions of the 11 year planning process – complete with a huge transport assessment which has been challenged - whilst social services have been reduced for vulnerable elderly people?

Following a Public Inquiry in 1999 the Secretary of State refused planning permission to expand in April 2000, which was quashed by an order of court October 2000, and still refused in October 2002. Enlargement of the shopping centre would only be allowed as part of a wider regeneration, to include the areas south of the North Circular, with significant improvement to public transport.

How much money has been spent to get us back to where we were in 1999? The public needs cast iron proof that the shopping centre will not be built without the housing to which it is bound. Two Westfields have fulfilled the need for shopping malls, yet there is still a shortage of housing.
Have I slept for the past eleven years? Are we still in 2002 or are we in 2013 yet back where we started but with huge amounts of public money wasted on going through the motions of the 11 year planning process – complete with a huge transport assessment which has been challenged - whilst social services have been reduced for vulnerable elderly people? Following a Public Inquiry in 1999 the Secretary of State refused planning permission to expand in April 2000, which was quashed by an order of court October 2000, and still refused in October 2002. Enlargement of the shopping centre would only be allowed as part of a wider regeneration, to include the areas south of the North Circular, with significant improvement to public transport. How much money has been spent to get us back to where we were in 1999? The public needs cast iron proof that the shopping centre will not be built without the housing to which it is bound. Two Westfields have fulfilled the need for shopping malls, yet there is still a shortage of housing. kilburn

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